8AH movement crown stuck in position to set time, won't wind

I have an 1947 17 jewel 8AH movement in a watch that worked fine until recently when it seems the crown is stuck in the pulled out position to set the time. It wont click back in to wind the watch, I have tried this with the movement inside and outisde the case (nothing too forceful) It does run for a few seconds if you shake the movement. I also have a 21 jewel 8A movement in another watch that has a small piece of metal that sits between the movement and the case and seems to hold the stem. Is this possibly the problem? Is this an issue I can fix myself or best left to a professional? Any help would be appreciated.

1955mercury's picture
1955mercury
Posted May 28, 2015 - 9:30pm

Hi Wangbow. Interesting problem you have. Could you possibly post a picture of the back side of the movement out of the case? It would help if we could see if the stem is actually pulled out and has a space to allow it to be pushed back in or not. You might want to check to make sure the setting lever screw is snugged down for starters.

Reverend Rob's picture
Reverend Rob
Posted May 28, 2015 - 10:15pm

Panel Member

Could be a few things, but best to take it to a watchmaker. Your yoke may have slipped out of the groove of the sliding pinion, and is stuck against the intermediate wheel, where it will only turn the hands. You can't tell unless you pull the hands and dial. On some of these older movts, it is very easy to have the setting lever slip out of the groove in the stem, also. The bit of metal you mention is for dust 'proofing' and has nada to do with this, unless the stem has somehow jammed against it and has bent it into itself. Again, a watchmaker will sort this out quickly. 

Wangbow
Posted May 29, 2015 - 2:06pm

Thanks for the info. It definitely past my knowledge to fix a watch, besides letting down a mainspring, I'm basically useless, and I don't dare anything more with the cheap set of tools I have.

@Rev Rob, It's actually funny about that dust proof piece because the very first vintage watch I bought, with the 21 jewel 8AH actually was dead on arrival. I had bought it off of Ebay and I had found out after I had paid for it that it was relisted because the watch was returned by the previous buyer because it didn't work. Long story short, I was kicking myself for buying someone else's return of a dead watch. So I opened it up, saw that this dust guard was jammed between the case and the movement itself and preventing the stem from being pushed in. Two seconds with a tweezer, and I had a functioning 1949 His Excellency I paid less than $16 for. 

I'll try to add some pics tonight or tomorrow. I have some dififculty getting clear pictures in general with my Ipad, which is what I use nowadays, I have to take a general picture then crop it until its also too blurry to see. I'll look into trying to find my old digital camera.

Wangbow
Posted May 29, 2015 - 6:10pm

I tried adding pics. Don't know if it worked. There is space for the crown to move inwards and outwards, it just seems to not be catching the gears at all in the inwards position. 

1955mercury's picture
1955mercury
Posted May 29, 2015 - 6:16pm

Your pictures didn't work Wangbow. If you can feel the stem click when you push it in, there's a possibility the stem is broken into or in two. Not sure which is correct.

mybulova_admin
Posted May 30, 2015 - 12:12am

Club 5000Panel Member

 

Certainly sounds like the issue is under the dial with the setting lever, and as Rev said should be fixed by someone who knows what they are doing, unless you want to be adventurous and teach yourself how to fix these beauties. There are a number of members on site that might be able to help you with the repair.

Wangbow
Posted May 30, 2015 - 11:09am

Damn I tried with those pics. Anyway,the stem doesnt feel like it clicks, ju slides in and out. I am interested in learning how to repair my vintage watches. Can anyone recommend where I can buy a beginners set of tools and a book on watch repair?

Reverend Rob's picture
Reverend Rob
Posted May 30, 2015 - 1:00pm

Panel Member
 

The best bang for your buck in watch tools are used quality ones, because the cheap ones are awful, not mentioning any names or countries of origin..eBay is a great resource for this, and you will find tool suggestions in DeCarle's books. Another excellent resource is the NAWCC marts. 

I can recommend the WOSTEP textbook 'The Theory of Horology', because nothing beats really understanding why you are doing something. I can also recommend Donald DeCarle's 'Practical Watch Repairing', and 'Practical Watch Adjusting'. 

AWCI holds courses in watchmaking, from beginning to advanced and certification in the US. Having attended one there in Cincinnati, I can recommend them highly. There are still about 6 schools in the US also, if you want to really pursue the trade.

 

1955mercury's picture
1955mercury
Posted May 31, 2015 - 12:35pm

Wangbow, there's a CD-Rom you can find for  sale on ebay that's the home study course from the Chicago School of Watchmaking. It sells for around $30. I would recommend it as a good starter to learning how to do repair your own watches. It includes a listing of the tools used and their purpose in watchmaking. You won't get a PHD in horology from that course, but it's written in an easy to understand format that won't over whelm you. You also should consider getting a couple of cheaper watches to do a little practicing on before you tackle a watch you value. You're probably going to fatally wound a few during the self taught learning stages.

JP
Posted May 31, 2015 - 2:17am

Panel Member

If you check our data base you will find the Chicago manual and a Bulova School of Watchmaking training manual as well and can down load them to learn from.

Wangbow
Posted May 31, 2015 - 12:18pm

Thank you every, I really appreciate all the feedback and suggestions.

I'm currently printing out some of the resources suggested by JP. I downloaded TM 9-1575 war department technical manual for wristwatches and pocket watches circa April 6 1945 last night as well, I can submit this manual as a resource if that is allowed since obviously I am not the author of it, but it is government issue and not classified. I'll look for the WOSTEP book on theory and the CD as well. I much rather start with theory and try to fatally wound as few watches as possible. But then again, that sounds like a great excuse to pick a few more watches up in the near future!

Wangbow
Posted May 31, 2015 - 12:20pm

Thank you every, I really appreciate all the feedback and suggestions.

I'm currently printing out some of the resources suggested by JP. I downloaded TM 9-1575 war department technical manual for wristwatches and pocket watches circa April 6 1945 last night as well, I can submit this manual as a resource if that is allowed since obviously I am not the author of it, but it is government issue and not classified. I'll look for the WOSTEP book on theory and the CD as well. I much rather start with theory and try to fatally wound as few watches as possible. But then again, that sounds like a great excuse to pick a few more watches up in the near future!